Friday, April 28, 2017

#BLM Analysis Table

Press# 15: Alton Sterling and When Black Lives Stop Mattering
Rhetorical Device, Fallacy, Perelman
Quote/Example
Analysis
Rhetorical device:
     Anaphora
“I don’t think any of us could have imagined how tiny cameras would allow us to see, time and again, injustices perpetrated, mostly against black people, by police officers. I don’t think we could have imagined that video of police brutality would not translate into justice, and I don’t think we could have imagined how easy it is to see too much”
The use of “I don’t think’ repeatedly is interesting because it makes it seem as though the author is becoming tired, frustrated, and fed up with the same events happening. And at the end of “I don’t think,” she uses either the word “we,” or “us” as if she can speak for an entire marginalized group of people. Not only is she angry, but the ones she is speaking for as well, who might can’t voice their opinion in article style. 
Fallacy:
   Appeal to consequences
“Charges might be brought against the two officers involved, but, as history both recent and not shows us, it is rare for police officers to be convicted in such shootings.”
The hope with this statement is to see justice, but the author kind of reminds the audience of America’s history with crimes like this one. The author makes sure that we don’t forget the long history of America without directly stating exactly what she means, because she knows that she doesn’t have to explain something society tends to forget.
Perelman:
    Premise Modifiers:
      Presence-Space
“The video that truly haunts me is from a news conference with Quinyetta McMillon, the mother of Alton Sterling’s oldest child, a 15-year-old boy, who sobbed and cried out for his father as his mother read her statement. If the video of his father’s death feels too familiar, the video of this child’s raw and enormous grief must not.”
Since the author reminds us previously that this has happened before on numerous occasions, this case feels just like the others.




Video# 6: A City Reacts: State of Emergency - Ferguson, Missouri (Dispatch 10)
Rhetorical Device, Fallacy, Perelman
Quote/Example
Analysis
Rhetorical Device:
    Angle- Eye level
The interviews of the different people throughout the video during Ferguson hearing
Nothing really in the video is shown from high or low angles, as if they want us to see and feel the emotions that are happening.
Fallacy:
   Emotional Appeal
Interviews
As the hearing is going on, we get to see and listen to others thoughts on the matter. This is important because the video was shot at the time the Ferguson hearing was going on. Each interviewee, was angry at the state at which their city was in, and angry that yet again another shooting has happened. A lot of them were there for support because one person said, “it could’ve been my son or nephew.” It captures the audience attention by making sure we’re paying attention to the live action.
Perelman:
    Premise Modifiers:
      Presence-Time
The interviews
I feel because this video was captured during the time of the hearing and interviews were being conducted of different protestors, I feel as though getting the people’s reactions made the video more personal to others across the country who may have been feeling the same way. It’s possible that the interviews were raw (meaning you can tell they weren’t acting for the camera) Since this was raw footage it makes the audience at home watching supporting, feel a connection and understand.

                                                                                                                                                                        Social media#2 Instagram: Looked at the 3rd picture posted and the caption
Rhetorical Device, Fallacy, Perelman
Quote/Example
Analysis
Rhetorical Device:
    Color- High         Contrast
3rd picture posted
Although it’s a picture of a woman, she is wearing a dashiki, which is made up of different bright colors. Behind her are bright colors as well.
Fallacy:
   Appeal to emotion
“Feminist, fat, queer blogger Jessica Hipolito reminding us all that the resistance of Black people is not new. It comes from a deep history that we must not forget and always be connected to our inherited power as we struggle for freedom. #BLM2BRA #BlackWomenLead
The caption itself identifies with the picture, and the caption first describe the woman that is shown speaking giving her physical attributes to try and make us feel a connection with her. Also, describing the long history America has had.




No comments:

Post a Comment